Quick Answer: What Is The Difference Between Possessive Adjectives And Possessive Pronouns In Spanish?

Is someone’s possessive?

The possessive adjective for someone..

What is a possessive pronoun in Spanish?

A possessive pronoun replaces a noun preceded by a possessive determiner like mi, tu, su, etc. This noun being replaced is called the antecedent. … In Spanish, possessive pronouns indicate the possessor (me, you, them, etc.) and it must agree in number and gender with the antecedent.

What are examples of possessive nouns?

Here are examples of plural possessive nouns:Cattle’s pasture.Geese’s eggs.Women’s clothes.Children’s toys.Mice’s traps.People’s ideas.Feet’s toenails.Nuclei’s form.More items…

What are the 5 pronouns in Spanish?

Spanish Personal Subject PronounsI: Yo.You: Tú (informal) / Usted (Formal):He: Él.She: Ella.We: Nosotros / Nosotras.You, plural and informal: Vosotros / Vosotras.You, plural and formal: Ustedes.They: Ellos / Ellas.

How do you use possessive pronouns in Spanish?

Here are the possessive pronouns of Spanish with simple examples of their use:mío, mía, míos, mías — mine.tuyo, tuya, tuyos, tuyas — yours (singular informal)suyo, suya, suyos, suyas — his, hers, yours (singular formal or plural formal), its, theirs.nuestro, nuestra, nuestros, nuestras — ours.More items…•

What is the meaning of possessive pronouns?

Possessive pronouns describe what things belong to which people, like “her shoe” or “the book is mine.” Possessive pronouns can be adjectives, like “his bicycle,” or they can stand in for nouns, like “the seats are theirs.” Neither of these forms should have apostrophes to show possession — so it’s ours (not our’s) …

What are stressed possessive adjectives in Spanish?

In Spanish there are different forms of possessive adjectives depending on whether the noun is masculine or feminine, singular or plural. There are also two different sets of possessive adjectives: long/stressed forms (explained here) and short/unstressed forms. yours (Ud.) yours (Uds.)

How do you use possessive adjectives in Spanish?

Possessive adjectives, like all adjectives in Spanish, must agree with the noun they modify. Thus, if the noun is feminine, the possessive adjective must be feminine, too. However, in Spanish the masculine and the feminine forms of the possessive determiners mi, mis, tu, tus, su, and sus are the same.

What is an example of a possessive adjective?

They are words that modify a noun to show a form of possession, a sense of belonging or ownership to a specific person, animal or thing. The possessive adjectives that are used in the English language are: my, your, our, its, her, his, and their; each one corresponds to a subject pronoun.

How do you teach possessive adjectives in Spanish?

Spanish possessive adjectives are always placed before nouns or words, just like in English. Therefore, if we want to say “His car is new”, then we just need to find the proper possessive adjective (SU) and say “Su carro es nuevo”, where CARRO is the noun this person owns.

What are the 12 personal pronouns?

In Modern English the personal pronouns include: “I,” “you,” “he,” “she,” “it,” “we,” “they,” “them,” “us,” “him,” “her,” “his,” “hers,” “its,” “theirs,” “our,” “your.” Personal pronouns are used in statements and commands, but not in questions; interrogative pronouns (like “who,” “whom,” “what”) are used there.

What is the difference between possessive adjectives and possessive pronouns?

A possessive adjective is an adjective that is used to show ownership. It comes before a noun in the sentence and lets us know to whom the noun belongs. A possessive pronoun does show ownership, but it does not come before a noun or in a noun phrase. …

What is the meaning of possessive adjective?

Definition of Possessive Adjective: A word that indicates the possession of the noun to a person/a few people. The possessive adjectives are my, our, your, his, their, her, and its.

What is a possessive adjective in Irish?

Possessive adjectives in Irish are similar, but they’re a little more complex. For one thing, Irish uses the same word (a) to mean “his,” “her,” and “their.” Like a lot of European languages, Irish also has different words for “your” singular and “your” plural.

What are the long forms of possessive adjectives in Spanish?

List of Long-form Possessive AdjectivesAdjective TypeMasculine Singular FormFeminine Singular FormSecond person formal singular (usted)suyosuyaThird person singular (él, ella)suyosuyaFirst person plural (nosotros)nuestronuestraSecond person plural (vosotros)vuestrovuestra4 more rows

What is the meaning of a possessive noun?

A possessive noun is a noun that possesses something—i.e., it has something. In most cases, a possessive noun is formed by adding an apostrophe +s to the noun, or if the noun is plural and already ends in s, only an apostrophe needs to be added.

What are possessive adjectives in Spanish examples?

The Spanish possessive adjective indicates who or what possesses or owns something, just like in English. For example: This is MY brother. He is YOUR friend. Possessive adjectives in Spanish have a singular and plural form, according to the thing someone possesses.

What are the two types of possessive pronouns?

They are the pronouns that help us show possession or ownership in a sentence. There are two types of possessive pronouns: The strong (or absolute) possessive pronouns are mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, and theirs.

What are the 7 possessive pronouns?

The possessive pronouns are my, our, your, his, her, its, and their. There’s also an “independent” form of each of these pronouns: mine, ours, yours, his, hers, its, and theirs.

Can a verb be possessive?

The verbs below are used for “possession” (have, belong, own, posses). … Possessive forms are frequently modifiers for verb forms used as nouns, or gerunds. Using the possessive will affect how we read the sentence. Usually, almost always in fact, we use the possessive form of a noun or pronoun to modify a gerund.

Is US a possessive adjective?

The possessive adjectives are my, your, his, her, its, our, their, and whose. A possessive adjective sits before a noun (or a pronoun) to show who or what owns it.